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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
understand if he is indeed conscious and does survive before reading him miranda rights; is that correct? >> i believe molly line will be talking about that a little bit as well. there is a loophole. there is a way they don't have to. so he was not read his miranda rights to allow to ask questions of him. we don't know if questions have been asked. they may have asked questions of him when he was under the situation he was in, of course being pretty seriously injured. they do believe he is going to make it. that was something, not only important for them to do that because that is what we do in this society but important because of this investigation. last night we were told he was being brought here for treatment. we weren't too far behind the ambulance. as you made your way through boston, you could see many of the businesses reopened. you saw restaurants and bars reopened. at one point there was a small college and 500 students had gone into the streets and blocked off all four lanes cheering, holding signs and as first responders and medical teams came through that had nothing to do
gathering purposes since he's been president. when we read these people their miranda rights and give them a lawyer the only way you can gather intelligence is if the terror suspect and the lawyer will allow you to do so. intelligence gathering through plea bargaining is not going to make us safe. jenna: so we spoke to a former member of the fbi on our show yesterday that seems to not have a problem with miranda rights, that is their opinion. we'll see what they get as far as information from this one suspect. >> can i mention something. jenna: please. >> i don't have a problem with miranda rights. this man can only be tried in federal court. he's never eligible for military commissions. a first year law student could convict this person. what i'm worried about is what does he know about future attacks? he's telling us that his brother was the bad guy, he's sort of just along for the ride. they had no international connections. guess what, he's down-playing his involvement. what i am suggesting is that we use the national security legal system where we can interview him without a lawyer to
'll give him a lawyer, lawyer up, get miranda. >> oh, yeah. now, a couple of things about that. they have suggested that there's an exception to miranda for public safety which we all know there is. i think they've been very extravagant in assuming they'll get the largest possible exception under the law and the reality is in different circuits that exception is interpreted differently. >> if they think they don't have to give the guy the miranda rights, you have the right to remain silent and right to an attorney, they think we have a big exemption, before they wofer that and try to get all of the information from the person and it may come back to bite them because some jurisdictions don't see it that way. >> absolutely right. in some places if you're a dangerous offender you get a long exception. in others, it doesn't matter how dangerous you are, if police basically rendered you-- >> what should happen. if we identify the person what do you think as a doj think next. >> in the person fits the definition of enany combatant, al-qaeda affiliate or someone we're at war with, that presiden
-value suspects is standing by to question him. officialsofficials have said thl not read him his miranda right, invoking the rare public safety exception. dozens remain hospitalized. the death toll is 3 people from the bombing and 1 others wiewbed. they are also believed to have shot a police officer, marking a forth killing. "fox news sunday" is right after america's news headquarters, and there will be more on boston police commissioner. the investigation enters a new phase as agents focus on getting answers from dzhokhar tsarnaev to questions like and how why and continuing to investigate whether anyone else was involved. michael sullivan is very familiar with these kinds of investigations, he is a former u.s. attorney who prosecuted would-be shoe bomber richard reid. thank you for joining us today. >> you're welcome, shannon. >> shannon: put on your legal cap for the first couple of questions. how do you think it's appropriate to best treat the suspect to really bar future legal challenges against any information that the government could get from him at this point and stay within the conf
with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety." the administration had rightly invoked this public safety exception in the case of the boston suspect which provided our national security professionals a discreet period of time to gather intelligence from the suspect without the presence of his lawyer. however, soon after questioning him this way, the administration recently reversed itself and read the suspect his miranda rights. in doing so, the administration, in my view, gave up a valuable opportunity to lawfully and thoroughly question the suspect for purposes of gathering intelligence about potential future terrorist plots. whether we will be able to acquire such information has now been left entirely at the discretion of the suspect and his lawyer. put simply, the suspect has been told he has the right to remain silent, and if he doesn't want to provide intelligence, he doesn't have to. is this a responsible balance between a citizen's rights and our national security? the
was provided before or after that judge/magistrate was there and r read him his miranda rights? the right to remain silent and the right to have an attorney? >> sources have indicated to us that was part of a questioning that they did under the -- fbi agent does under a national security exemption, before he was assigned counsel. they had the ability in the interest of public safety exception to be able to ask questions, were there additional coconspirators, where and were there additional explosives. the source of things you want to know immediately in order to protect the public. presumably base wanted on what we are hearing, those are the questions they asked and the kinds of responses prior to the first appearance yesterday. >> that would fit in with the public safety exception in the there a in providing the miranda rights to this criminal defendant as he now is, charges have been read to him. fran, we'll stay in close touch with you, fran townsend. much more from boston in just a moment. other news that we're watching as well. the fbi, back in washington, up on capitol hill, lawmake
a person of interest because you don't want to do that because it might invoke some rules of miranda, was the person in custody, was a custodial interrogation. if a prosecution comes forward can they get somebody who was tried in the case. an phone can come back and throw this statement or this confession or this statement out because the rights were violated of this individual. i think that's really important. i think it's significant that they at least were saying person of interest, someone they were questioning. the burns i think is also indicative somebody was very close to the blast point. that's important. >> one second. we will get back to the panel in a second. there's a press conference at massachusetts general hospital of which we were just speaking and we will take that. >> right now the hospital is operating in a business as usual mode with the exception just of some heightened security, of which i am sure you are aware. >> questions for the doctor? >> the nature you are of the injuries? >> these are blast-type injuries. these are very high force, high impact type injuri
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)